Will You Post a Review?

Dearest readers of Evangelina Takes Flight,

Would you be so kind as to post a review on the site where you bought the book? Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Target or elsewhere… I have a few GREAT reviews out there, but I’d like to see more. Be honest with it. No glowing review if the book does not deserve it (but a glowing review if it DOES deserve it). Just what you thought of it, and how the book made you feel. Thank you. I appreciate the tremendous support I’m getting for this book – such an important read, especially now in these uncertain times when lawful, contributing immigrants (much like my own family in Evangelina’s time) are vilified.

This is what Kirkus Reviews had to say about the story’s relevance to the world today:

In 1911 during the Mexican Revolution, a Mexican family seeking refuge from Pancho Villa, soldiers, and violence migrates to Texas. Debut novelist Noble introduces 13-year-old Evangelina de León—a self-aware, observant, caring daughter and sister—her six siblings, parents, and abuelo, who live on a ranch located outside of Mariposa, a small, northern (fictional) Mexican town. Days after her sister’s quinceañera and the news of imminent raids and violence, the family splits up and, in waves, arrive at a relative’s home in Texas. They have not left struggle behind, however. Signs that read “No Perros! No Negros! No Mexicanos!” tell them they are shunned at grocery stores. The political and racial tensions in their new home town are not subtle: the family is denied a burial for a stillborn son; foreign-born children must use the woods as a bathroom instead of the school’s outhouse; a black boy is shot; a Lebanese kid is harassed; a young Mexican boy is spat upon; and both white children and adults are cruel to the immigrants in the neighborhood. Using the first person with Spanish sprinkled throughout, Noble propels the novel with vivid imagery and lovely prose, successfully guiding readers behind an immigrant family’s lens. Loosely based on Noble’s own grandmother’s story, this debut hits awfully close to home in the current anti-immigrant political climate. (Historical fiction. 10-14)

 

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